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Review: Vegepod for Elevated Raised Bed Gardening

Review: Vegepod for Elevated Raised Bed Gardening

My dad has always been a big vegetable gardener, but last year he had a stroke that limited his his ability to garden. For his birthday, we decided to get him an elevated raised garden that would help him get his hobby back. 

I researched a few types of elevated garden systems, but most seemed clunky and difficult to assemble. Plus, they were the perfect height for a deer's all-you-can-eat buffet. I saw the Vegepod at a local garden center and it seemed like a good match for our site conditions. 

Vegepod Advantages

The Vegepod is covered, which would keep deer out, and perhaps it would also extend their short USDA Zone 5a growing season. Since it would be difficult for my dad to carry a watering can, the sprinkler and self-watering trough was a selling point. The price was in the ballpark of what we wanted to spend, too. I ordered the small one with the stand from the website. If he liked it and wanted more garden space, we could easily add another unit. 

The Vegepod arrives.

The Vegepod arrives.

Putting the Vegepod Together

The Base

Assembling the raised bed was easy and it only took around 10 minutes. I would totally buy just the plastic bed portion for my own raised garden. Coincidentally, it was the perfect size to sit on my porch railing, and would look great with trailing plants and a few brightly colored annuals. Unfortunately for my porch, the Vegepod base is not sold separately. 

The raised bed was super easy to put together.  

The raised bed was super easy to put together.  

The Stand

Next, I put together the steel stand. It took longer to bolt together, but the instructions were clear and I didn't have any trouble. Though it was smaller than I expected, it was sturdy and substanial. 

The Vegepod stand assembly was tedious, but straightforward.

The Vegepod stand assembly was tedious, but straightforward.

The Cover

The cover was the worst part of assembly. The written instructions were generic to any size cover, which made things confusing. The instructions had me affix the zip ties in "several" places, rather than being specific, and I was a little confused about where to put the hose clamps. I had to watch the online videos to figure out how to attach the hinge clips to the base because the instructions had me stumped. Once I had it together, the hose connector wouldn't fit through the hole in the screen so I had to cut a wider opening, and then the connector didn't fit our hose and sprayed water everywhere. We bulked the connection up with extra rubber washers, but maybe those should've come with the kit.

Things had been going so well up until this point! But, the videos on the Vegepod website were helpful and IKEA furniture instructions are still much worse than this. 

The cover was the only part that didn't go so smoothly. 

The cover was the only part that didn't go so smoothly. 

Planting the Vegepod

We delivered it to my parents' house, filled it with soil and plants, and it was good to go! My dad is growing 2 bush tomato plants, carrots, radishes, and green onions. So far, so good! 

The finished product! 

The finished product! 

(Green) Thumbs Up for the Vegepod

Overall, the Vegepod was easy to assemble and the construction of the bed portion was actually quite ingenious. I was impressed by the quality of the materials and how sturdy it was once it was filled with soil. We'll see how the harvest goes!  

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